Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

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Counting the lobbyists

Counting the lobbyists at the climate talksWhich lobbyists are inside the Copenhagen climate talks? Who's inside the climate talks?

There are thousands of business lobbyists at the UN climate talks in Copenhagen, but the biggest group once again appears to be from the Angry Mermaid candidate, the International Emissions Trading Association (IETA).

IETA has 486 people in Copenhagen, including chief executive Henry Derwent and representatives from IETA member companies such as Gazprom, EON, CDC and another Angry Mermaid candidate Shell.

IETA had the largest non-government delegation at the UN climate talks in 2007 and 2008 - and clearly didn’t want to be crowded out in Copenhagen either.

Some of the other candidates for the Angry Mermaid Award appear among the 136 delegates representing the International Chamber of Commerce - including representatives from South African coal-to-liquid company Sasol and biotech giant Monsanto.

Shell is also represented in the delegations for the European Round Table of Industrialists (former chief exec Jeroen van der Veer is a delegate), the International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development.

The Round Table for Responsible Soy (nominated for the Angry Mermaid Award with Monsanto) has its own delegation here in Copenhagen - no doubt working alongside Monsanto to promote GM soy as a “climate-friendly” crop.

Angry Mermaid candidate the International Air Transport Association (IATA) is also present with 36 representatives, including British Airways chief executive Willie Walsh and IATA director Giovanni Bisignani.

The European Chemical Industry Council (Cefic) - also nominated for an Angry Mermaid - has 28 delegates in Copenhagen, including representatives from German chemical giant BASF, Dow Chemicals and Bayer.

With so many people trying to influence the talks, space inside the conference centre is going to be limited next week - perhaps the UNFCCC will limit the number of business lobbyists allowed in?

There are thousands of business lobbyists at the UN climate talks in Copenhagen, but the biggest group once again appears to be from the Angry Mermaid candidate, the International Emissions Trading Association (IETA). IETA has 486 people in Copenhagen, including chief executive Henry Derwent and representatives from IETA member companies such as Gazprom, EON, CDC and another Angry Mermaid candidate Shell. IETA had the largest non-government delegation at the UN climate talks in 2007 and 2008 - and clearly didn’t want to be crowded out in Copenhagen either. Some of the other candidates for the Angry Mermaid Award appear among the 136 delegates representing the International Chamber of Commerce - including representatives from South African coal-to-liquid company Sasol and biotech giant Monsanto. Shell is also represented in the delegations for the European Round Table of Industrialists (former chief exec Jeroen van der Veer is a delegate), the International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development. The Round Table for Responsible Soy (nominated for the Angry Mermaid Award with Monsanto) has its own delegation here in Copenhagen - no doubt working alongside Monsanto to promote GM soy as a “climate-friendly” crop. Angry Mermaid candidate the International Air Transport Association (IATA) is also present with 36 representatives, including British Airways chief executive Willie Walsh and IATA director Giovanni Bisignani. The European Chemical Industry Council (Cefic) - also nominated for an Angry Mermaid - has 28 delegates in Copenhagen, including representatives from German chemical giant BASF, Dow Chemicals and Bayer. With so many people trying to influence the talks, space inside the conference centre is going to be limited next week - perhaps the UNFCCC will limit the number of business lobbyists allowed in?
 

The corporate lobby tour

The European Ombudsman has opened a case on the European Commission's industry-dominated Expert Group on the risky and dangerous practice of 'fracking for natural gas.
Four months before world governments meet in Paris to negotiate the deal they claim will “save the climate”, 1500 protestors took matters into their own hands by entering an opencast lignite mine owned by energy provider RWE in western Germany.
Reforms announced last week do little to address flaws in EU's Emissions Trading System.
Today's Commission announcement extends a failing system for another 15 years.
Policy-makers want their decisions to be based on the best available evidence; controlling the relevant science is therefore a key component of the strategy of the lobbyists who can afford it. During two days, this conference will analyse evidence politics and discuss evidence policies to find out how to make the existing EU scientific evidence appraisal system evolve towards better serving the public interest.
The European Ombudsman has opened a case on the European Commission's industry-dominated Expert Group on the risky and dangerous practice of 'fracking for natural gas.
Policy prescriptions: the firepower of the EU pharmaceutical lobby and implications for public health
A citizen's tour of corporate power in Brussels 03/09/15

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