Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

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Counting the lobbyists

Counting the lobbyists at the climate talksWhich lobbyists are inside the Copenhagen climate talks? Who's inside the climate talks?

There are thousands of business lobbyists at the UN climate talks in Copenhagen, but the biggest group once again appears to be from the Angry Mermaid candidate, the International Emissions Trading Association (IETA).

IETA has 486 people in Copenhagen, including chief executive Henry Derwent and representatives from IETA member companies such as Gazprom, EON, CDC and another Angry Mermaid candidate Shell.

IETA had the largest non-government delegation at the UN climate talks in 2007 and 2008 - and clearly didn’t want to be crowded out in Copenhagen either.

Some of the other candidates for the Angry Mermaid Award appear among the 136 delegates representing the International Chamber of Commerce - including representatives from South African coal-to-liquid company Sasol and biotech giant Monsanto.

Shell is also represented in the delegations for the European Round Table of Industrialists (former chief exec Jeroen van der Veer is a delegate), the International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development.

The Round Table for Responsible Soy (nominated for the Angry Mermaid Award with Monsanto) has its own delegation here in Copenhagen - no doubt working alongside Monsanto to promote GM soy as a “climate-friendly” crop.

Angry Mermaid candidate the International Air Transport Association (IATA) is also present with 36 representatives, including British Airways chief executive Willie Walsh and IATA director Giovanni Bisignani.

The European Chemical Industry Council (Cefic) - also nominated for an Angry Mermaid - has 28 delegates in Copenhagen, including representatives from German chemical giant BASF, Dow Chemicals and Bayer.

With so many people trying to influence the talks, space inside the conference centre is going to be limited next week - perhaps the UNFCCC will limit the number of business lobbyists allowed in?

There are thousands of business lobbyists at the UN climate talks in Copenhagen, but the biggest group once again appears to be from the Angry Mermaid candidate, the International Emissions Trading Association (IETA). IETA has 486 people in Copenhagen, including chief executive Henry Derwent and representatives from IETA member companies such as Gazprom, EON, CDC and another Angry Mermaid candidate Shell. IETA had the largest non-government delegation at the UN climate talks in 2007 and 2008 - and clearly didn’t want to be crowded out in Copenhagen either. Some of the other candidates for the Angry Mermaid Award appear among the 136 delegates representing the International Chamber of Commerce - including representatives from South African coal-to-liquid company Sasol and biotech giant Monsanto. Shell is also represented in the delegations for the European Round Table of Industrialists (former chief exec Jeroen van der Veer is a delegate), the International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development. The Round Table for Responsible Soy (nominated for the Angry Mermaid Award with Monsanto) has its own delegation here in Copenhagen - no doubt working alongside Monsanto to promote GM soy as a “climate-friendly” crop. Angry Mermaid candidate the International Air Transport Association (IATA) is also present with 36 representatives, including British Airways chief executive Willie Walsh and IATA director Giovanni Bisignani. The European Chemical Industry Council (Cefic) - also nominated for an Angry Mermaid - has 28 delegates in Copenhagen, including representatives from German chemical giant BASF, Dow Chemicals and Bayer. With so many people trying to influence the talks, space inside the conference centre is going to be limited next week - perhaps the UNFCCC will limit the number of business lobbyists allowed in?
 

In the wake of Volkswagen’s diesel emissions scandal, Corporate Europe Observatory has obtained documents that show how the car industry has continued to undermine Europe’s proposed new emissions test standards.

A final deal will soon come out of COP21. Lets take a look back at the environment in which this deal has been hashed out.

Watch how corporations are using TTIP to promote their climate-trashing agenda.

“If you like greenwashing clap your hands”

CEO turns the spotlight on another of the interest groups operating within the European Parliament.

The voice of the Dutch Government has been loud and clear in Brussels on the issue of cisgenic plants. The Dutch have waged a sustained campaign to have new GM techniques – and in particular cisgenesis – excluded from EU GMO regulations. Several Dutch ministries, the Dutch Parliament, the Dutch Permanent Representation in Brussels, and Dutch MEPs have energetically pursued this goal.

At least one developer of new GM crops – Canadian-based Cibus – has attempted to bypass the European policy process by presenting policy makers with a fait accompli: decisions by individual Member States on the regulatory status of new techniques, as well as prematurely-launched trials of new GM crops.

The biotech industry is staging an audacious bid to have a whole new generation of genetic engineering techniques excluded from European regulations. The pending decision of the European Commission on the regulation of these so-called 'new GMOs' represents a climax point in the ongoing below-the-radar attack by industry on GM laws.

The corporate lobby tour

Stop the Crop

Alternative Trade Mandate