Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

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Países latinoamericanos discuten la protección a inversores extranjeros

In-depth piece about the problems with investor-state disputes in the economics blog of El Pais, going deep into the results of the CEO/TNI study "Profiting from Injustice": Los árbitros tienden hacer una interpretación expansivas de las normas a favor del inversor y se niegan a tomar en cuenta los dereches humanos y sociales recogidos por la legislación internacional."

Published by: 
Alejandro Rebossio, El Pais
 

The corporate lobby tour

Law firms and their stake in TTIP
The prospective EU-US trade deal could be the world's biggest such treaty. The revolving door between public and private sectors is helping to grease the wheels of the TTIP corporate lobby. This phenomenon creates great potential for conflicts of interest, and demonstrates the synergies between business interests and the Commission, UK government, and others when it comes to trade negotiations.
Which businesses are pushing most for the proposed EU-US trade deal TTIP? Who’s influencing EU negotiators? Corporate Europe Observatory’s new info-graphics reveal the corporate lobby behind the TTIP talks.
An often asked question is whether TTIP will weaken Europe's rules over genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Meanwhile, the biotech industry is pushing for the products of the 'next generation' biotech crops to escape the EU's legislation on GMOs and therefore to go unregulated. Is there a link between this new push, and TTIP? Emails obtained via a Freedom of Information request show this might indeed be the case.
Story

Not our Europe

The ‘agreement’ that the eurozone countries and the Troika forced on the Greek government during the “night of shame” strangled space for a progressive project. It is not only dangerous for the Greeks, but for citizens all across the European Union.
Reforms announced last week do little to address flaws in EU's Emissions Trading System.
Today's Commission announcement extends a failing system for another 15 years.
The prospective EU-US trade deal could be the world's biggest such treaty. The revolving door between public and private sectors is helping to grease the wheels of the TTIP corporate lobby. This phenomenon creates great potential for conflicts of interest, and demonstrates the synergies between business interests and the Commission, UK government, and others when it comes to trade negotiations.

Stop the Crop

Alternative Trade Mandate