Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

EU in crisis: analysis, resistance and alternatives to Corporate Europe

  • Dansk
  • Nederlands
  • English
  • Suomi
  • Français
  • Deutsch
  • Ελληνικά
  • Italiano
  • Bokmål
  • Polski
  • Portuguese
  • Română
  • Slovenščina
  • Español
  • Svenska

Saturday 5 - Sunday 6 May 2012: Maison des Associations Internationales, Brussels

Join us in a two-day conference in Brussels with movements from across Europe to strengthen progressive responses to the EU's crisis.

Speakers will include Susan George - Carola Fischbach-Pyttel - Leigh Phillips - Esther Vivas - Mariana Mortágua - Alexis Passadakis - Miren Etxezarreta - Lina Filopoulou - Jakub Patočka - Andy Storey - Jorge Fael

Organised by Corporate Europe Observatory (CEO), in cooperation with the Transnational Institute (TNI) and with the support of the European Federation of Public Services Unions (EPSU)

Read this invitation in: Français, Nederlands, Dansk, Deutsch, Ελληνικά, Italiano, Portuguese, Español.

Register now! | Conference essay series

The EU’s response to the financial crisis and the escalating eurocrisis has exposed more clearly than ever the disastrous dominance of neoliberal ideology. Obsessed with budgetary discipline, EU decision-makers are imposing sweeping austerity measures, privatising public services and cutting welfare. Corporate lobby groups see their longstanding demands implemented overnight while the living standards of millions are undermined and economies grind to a halt.

The EU’s emphasis on free markets and deregulation in the last two decades was a crucial factor in causing the current crisis. This included:

  • Deregulation of the financial markets, allowing a credit-fuelled bubble that collapsed in 2008, and which boosted the powers of speculators

  • The single currency which exacerbated the differences between stronger and weaker economies

  • The drive for liberalisation and ‘competitiveness’ which left almost every sector of society exposed to market forces, at the expense of social rights, environmental regulation and public services.

These flawed policies were heavily influenced by corporate lobbying, reflecting how big business had captured the policy-making processes in Brussels and in member states.

Since 2008, billions of taxpayers' euros have been spent on saving banks that had recklessly gambled on speculative markets, transferring private debt to public debt. Following the crisis, the power of the financial lobbies - and their easy access to decision-makers - has ensured that only limited regulation has been introduced.

EU decision-makers pre-occupied with appeasing the financial markets are now implementing new ‘economic governance’ rules and a new EU treaty to support their “shock doctrine”. These measures challenge the core of democracy in Europe, putting crucial decisions in the hands of technocrats. This is the Europe of big banks and corporations which sidelines any attempt at a ‘Social Europe’.

There are encouraging signs of resistance. The indignados and occupy movements, union strikes and demonstrations, mark a growing rejection of the EU's free-market fundamentalism. These are indicators of a different Europe emerging: a Europe that insists on democracy and refuses to be run by big business and technocrats.

Since 1997, Corporate Europe Observatory has been working to expose and counter the influence of corporations that is distorting democracy and undermining social and environmental protection. The urgency of discussing workable alternatives, strategy and common actions at the European level has never been more evident. Join us to celebrate our 15th anniversary in a two-day conference in Brussels with movements from across Europe to strengthen progressive responses to the EU's crisis. The conference will be in English with translations into French and Spanish provided.

 

Register now or email for more information: conference2012@corporateeurope.org

 

Polluters in Peru blog

The 'cash for access' scandal in the UK has taken the House of Commons by storm and prompted a vote about banning certain second jobs for MPs. CEO looks at what the scandal shows us about the loopholes in the European Parliament's own rules and procedures.
Corporate Europe Observatory analyses the UK government's grid of stakeholders working on TTIP which clearly illustrates how the forces for and against the EU-US trade deal are shaping up.
The recent cases of former MEPs going through the revolving door, including a number of UK Liberal Democrats, has once again shown why the European Parliament needs to draw up new rules to tackle the risk of any possible conflicts of interest arising.
Many who walked past the BNP Paribas Fortis' central Brussels branch during their lunch break yesterday were surprised by what they saw: activists-turned-bailiffs removing tables, chairs and other materials from the building, leaving them out on the pavement. At a time of severe cuts to social spending in Belgium because all the money has been spent bailing out the banks, citizens repossessed bank furniture as the first step in recouping the billions of Euros that BNP Paribas – who controversially bought Begian bank Fortis in 2009 – helped its client avoid via its 214 branches located in tax havens.

Alternative Trade Mandate

Corporate Europe Forum