Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

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Cooperating to deregulate

TTIP fits neatly with the domestic deregulation agenda of the EU

Two separate developments on European regulatory issues – regulatory cooperation under TTIP and the "Better Regulation Agenda" – are set to introduce a new style of rulemaking in the EU.

When negotiations began on the EU-US trade deal known as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership or TTIP, it was clear that “regulatory coherence” was to become the cornerstone of the agreement. It was less clear to most, how negotiators would tackle the diverging approaches to regulation that have been a source of conflict between the two powers for at least two decades. Now, after two years of negotiations, “regulatory cooperation” has emerged as the key strategy chosen. 

Regulatory cooperation is a series of procedures designed to allow the two regulatory rulebooks to converge over time. Especially at this current moment, the implications for the decision-making process in the EU are serious. In the EU institutions, a strategy to roll back “burdensome regulation” for businesses, has been unfolding for the better part of 15 years, and recently, this “Better Regulation Agenda” has been stepped up. This context combined with Regulatory Cooperation under TTIP could open up a new phase of hyper-deregulation. 

Read the paper "Cooperating to deregulate" (download below), first presented at the Euromemorandum conference in Roskilde in Denmark, September 2015.

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A deregulation agenda is sweeping through the Commission & member states, particularly pushed by the UK.

The recent leak of many parts of TTIP, allowing us for the first time to read the negotiating position of the US, confirms our most serious concerns.

Dangerous attacks against regulations protecting public interest wouldn't be prevented by 'new' proposals.

Despite growing concerns among the European public, the new EU proposal on regulatory cooperation in TTIP does nothing to address the upcoming democratic threats.

Biodiversity collapse, the future of agriculture, politics versus science, EU States and the European Commission shifting blame on each other, industry's capture of the regulatory process through data secrecy, a Commissioner caught between Juncker, EU States, lobby groups, and his own services... The glyphosate saga, coming to an end this week with the European Commission's decision to extend its licence, has been an entry point into many broader problems. Overview.

The official EU assessment of glyphosate was based on unpublished studies owned by industry. Seven months later, the pesticide industry still fights disclosure and, so far, successfully. We obtained a copy of their arguments.

While CEO is not taking a position on the UK referendum, many of our publications are relevant to those who will have a vote, or those who are following the debate.

The current struggle in France over labour law reforms is not just between the Government and trade unions – a European battle is waged. The attacks on social rights stem in no small part from the web of EU-rules dubbed 'economic governance', invented to impose austerity policies on member states.

 
 
 
 
 
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