Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

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How the European Commission is doing the job of big business

Better Regulation and Regulatory Cooperation in TTIP

Regulatory cooperation in TTIP and Better Regulation, two processes for big business, which will weaken, delay or abolish standards

The European Commission is currently negotiating the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) with the United States. This trade deal threatens to reduce the social and environmental rights of people living in the US and the EU, in the interests of big business. A central aspect of this threat comes from plans to introduce “regulatory cooperation” between the negotiating partners.

Equally dangerous is the European Commission’s so-called “Better Regulation” agenda, which is an internal process that pre-dates the EU-US trade talks. “Better Regulation” is promoted as being about cutting unnecessary administrative burdens or red tape at the EU level. In reality it threatens essential environmental safeguards and citizens’ rights.

Both processes are creating obstacles and delays for decision-makers who want to introduce new regulations, and they risk creating “regulatory chill” as law makers are discouraged from introducing new measures in the public interest.

 

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A deregulation agenda is sweeping through the Commission & member states, particularly pushed by the UK.

The recent leak of many parts of TTIP, allowing us for the first time to read the negotiating position of the US, confirms our most serious concerns.

Dangerous attacks against regulations protecting public interest wouldn't be prevented by 'new' proposals.

Despite growing concerns among the European public, the new EU proposal on regulatory cooperation in TTIP does nothing to address the upcoming democratic threats.

A few weeks after the May coup against Dilma Rousseff by conservative parties backed by the country's largest corporations, Brazil's “interim” government, led by Michel Temer, signed an emergency loan to the State of Rio de Janeiro to help finance infrastructure for the 2016 Olympics. The bailout was conditional to selling off the State's public water supply and sanitation company, the Companhia Estadual de Águas e Esgotos (Cedae). 

When we interviewed City Councillor and chair of Rio’s Special Committee on the Water Crisis Renato Cinco, in December 2015, he was already warning against such privatisation threats and provided important background information on the water situation in Rio.

Never before has a former European Commission official been criticised as much for his post-EU career as ex-Commission president Barroso upon joining infamous US investment bank Goldman Sachs this summer. Citizens are outraged and evidence already points towards a gross violation of the EU Treaty.

Following the high-level appointment of former European Commission President José Manuel Barroso to Goldman Sachs, NGOs have launched a petition demanding stricter rules for ex-EU commissioners’ revolving door moves.

Corporate Europe Observatory's new report 'A spoonful of sugar' illustrates how the sugar lobby undermines existing laws and fights off much-needed measures that are vital for tackling Europe’s looming obesity crisis.

 
 
 
 
 
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The corporate lobby tour