Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

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Crucial lessons to be learned

This month the European Commission for the first time ever blocked an ex-Commissioner from taking up a job in the private sector. The former Internal Market Commission Charles McCreevy had to resign from his directorship at London-based banking start-up NBNK after Catherine Day, the Secretary General of the Commission informed him that the Commission was unable to approve the post. She told McCreevy that “should he wish to pursue this activity, a negative decision will be submitted to the Commission for adoption” on October 4. This was after the Ad Hoc Ethic’s Committee set up to advise the Commission on ex-Commissioners potential conflicts of interests issued a negative opinion on August 24. Corporate Europe Observatory has identified some key lessons to be learned from the events leading up to McCreevy's resignation - read the article here:

 
A few weeks after the May coup against Dilma Rousseff by conservative parties backed by the country's largest corporations, Brazil's “interim” government, led by Michel Temer, signed an emergency loan to the State of Rio de Janeiro to help finance infrastructure for the 2016 Olympics. The bailout was conditional to selling off the State's public water supply and sanitation company, the Companhia Estadual de Águas e Esgotos (Cedae). 

When we interviewed City Councillor and chair of Rio’s Special Committee on the Water Crisis Renato Cinco, in December 2015, he was already warning against such privatisation threats and provided important background information on the water situation in Rio.

Corporate Europe Observatory's new report 'A spoonful of sugar' illustrates how the sugar lobby undermines existing laws and fights off much-needed measures that are vital for tackling Europe’s looming obesity crisis.

José Manuel Barroso's move to Goldman Sachs has catapulted the EU’s revolving door problem onto the political agenda. It is symbolic of the excessive corporate influence at the highest levels of the EU.

Corporate Europe Observatory, Friends of the Earth and LobbyControl today wrote to Martin Schulz, President of the European Parliament, calling on him to investigate Angelika Nieber MEP over a possible conflict of interest.

 
 
 
 
 
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The corporate lobby tour