Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

Funding for climate change denial

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They are a tiny minority, a network of just a few dozen individuals around the world. Their numbers contrast starkly with the overwhelming majority of scientists who agree on the reality of man-made climate change, and on the urgent need for action. But the voices of climate deniers, are amplified in Europe by a handful of extremist free marketeers and right-wing think tanks, which try to block action to tackle climate change. Using non peer- reviewed publications, hijacking scientific debates, and targeting the mass media, they create confusion in the minds of the public about both the reality of global warming and the policies designed to curb emissions. This report investigates who funds the European think tanks that actively promote the denial of climate change.

Read the full report - and see the links between the groups here and in the US on the diagram below:

 

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