Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

Kangaroo Group's base in Parliament challenged

  • Dansk
  • Nederlands
  • English
  • Suomi
  • Français
  • Deutsch
  • Ελληνικά
  • Italiano
  • Bokmål
  • Polski
  • Portuguese
  • Română
  • Slovenščina
  • Español
  • Svenska

Corporate Europe Observatory has written to the European Parliament's College of Quaestors (the body responsible for administrative matters regarding the running of the Parliament) to question why the Kangaroo Group has an office in the Parliament building. The Kangaroo Group is not a registered Intergroup, nor does it appear to have any other official status vis-a-vis the European Parliament. But members of the group, which include some 50 big companies, including Goldman Sachs, BP and Volkswagen, benefit from the privileged access to the Parliament and to MEPs.

The arms industry uses the Kangaroo Group as one of its lobbying channels to shape EU security and defence policies, via the Kangaroo Group's working group on “Space, Defence & Security”, as CEO has highlighted in its new report on the arms lobby. CEO argues that such activities should not be coordinated from an office inside the European Parliament, and urges the Quaestors to ask the Kangaroo Group to find office space elsewhere.

 
To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Here are some examples of the blurry line between private business and public office that have characterised the Spanish nominee for the Climate Action and Energy Commissioner Arias Cañete’s career.
This must-watch film is now online. The film shows how corporations and actors within the Commission are teaming up to demolish a major piece of public health legislation.
CEO is looking for an experienced, French-speaking campaigner to join our team and strengthen our work on the EU-US trade and investment deal (TTIP). This position is a full time (36 hours per week) temporary position for one year.
Karmenu Vella has been a member of the Maltese parliament since 1976, but that hasn't prevented him from also holding a variety of external business roles at the same time including within the gambling industry. These recent outside interests make him unsuitable to be a commissioner.

Corporate Europe Forum