Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

Stop the EU attack on social rights

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New rules that could mean cuts to social expenditure, wages and workers' rights are currently being debated in the EU. If the proposals go ahead, decisions about such cuts could be made without public debate or discussion. Cuts would simply be imposed by EU technocrats. Such a decision undermines the very principles of democracy and threatens workers' rights and the welfare state.



This has to be stopped!



Corporate Europe Observatory has joined the ATTAC-Europe Network to help people write MEPs to ask them to help stop the proposals by rejecting them at an upcoming plenary vote in the European Parliament, set to take place on the 8th of June.



Please visit www.oureurope.org



Read Corporate Europe Observatory’s article on the issue:



An undemocratic economic governance
On the position of the majority in the European Parliament.



Next step for the Europact
On the business lobby organisation, the Europact and on the future of collective bargaining under the proposed new rules.



Business against Europe - On business lobby organisation BusinessEurope and its ability to influence the Europact and the proposals on economic governance.


Corporate EUtopia –  How new economic governance measure challenge democracy
Overall analysis of the significance of the proposed reforms of economic governance and on how they accommodate demands from the business community.


Barroso's silent revolution
- On the powers of the Commission under the proposed rules on economic governance

 

Polluters in Peru blog

The 'cash for access' scandal in the UK has taken the House of Commons by storm and prompted a vote about banning certain second jobs for MPs. CEO looks at what the scandal shows us about the loopholes in the European Parliament's own rules and procedures.
Corporate Europe Observatory analyses the UK government's grid of stakeholders working on TTIP which clearly illustrates how the forces for and against the EU-US trade deal are shaping up.
The recent cases of former MEPs going through the revolving door, including a number of UK Liberal Democrats, has once again shown why the European Parliament needs to draw up new rules to tackle the risk of any possible conflicts of interest arising.
Many who walked past the BNP Paribas Fortis' central Brussels branch during their lunch break yesterday were surprised by what they saw: activists-turned-bailiffs removing tables, chairs and other materials from the building, leaving them out on the pavement. At a time of severe cuts to social spending in Belgium because all the money has been spent bailing out the banks, citizens repossessed bank furniture as the first step in recouping the billions of Euros that BNP Paribas – who controversially bought Begian bank Fortis in 2009 – helped its client avoid via its 214 branches located in tax havens.

Alternative Trade Mandate

Corporate Europe Forum