Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

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Video on remunicipalisation: putting water back into public hands

A motion design documentary shows examples of cities reversing water privatization to regain public control. This video explores water 'remunicipalisation' in Buenos Aires and Paris, looking at the challenges and benefits of reclaiming public water. It calls on citizens worldwide to mobilize around this option. Remunicipalisation Works!

Find more case studies on the transition from private to public water provision (Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; Hamilton, Canada; and a national-level experiment in Malaysia) in the book available for free download at: http://www.municipalservicesproject.org/publication/remunicipalisation-putting-water-back-public-hands.
You can follow Municipal Services Project (MSP) on Twitter @MSPAlternatives and on Facebook!
Also visit CEO and TNI's Remunicipalisation Tracker at http://www.remunicipalisation.org
This video was commissioned by MSP, CEO and TNI.

 

Comments

Submitted by Art Cohen (not verified) on

Great work, CEO, TNI, and MSP! This is a powerful way to communicate about a complicated subject. I will try to spread it around. We are facing privatisation efforts all over the US. This animation can serve as well to prevent privatisation as to encourage remunicipalisation.

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CEO turns the spotlight on another of the interest groups operating within the European Parliament.

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