Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

Revolving doors

Read about people who've gone through the revolving door

The revolving door is one of the most important ways in which lobbyists can influence the political agenda in Brussels. When senior European decision-makers - Commissioners, MEPs, officials - leave office and go straight into lobby jobs, or when lobbyists join the EU institutions, the risk of significant conflicts of interest is great, undermining democratic, public-interest decision-making. CEO is working with the Alliance for Lobbying Transparency and Ethics Regulation (ALTER-EU) to challenge the revolving door and to demand that it is effectively regulated.

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The corporate lobby tour

Story

A telling mistake

Ms Barbara Gallani, who will become EFSA's Director for Communications from 1 May, was up until late March 2016 working for the largest lobby group for the food and drink industry in the UK, the Food and Drink Federation (FDF).

CEO reviews recent developments in the Commission's approach to the revolving door.

Our reaction to European Commission report on revolving door issue.

Conflicts of interest in the field of energy and climate policy are being ignored by EU institutions allowing some of the world’s biggest polluters to potentially benefit from the know-how and contact books of top Brussels insiders, according to a new report.

Stop the Crop

Alternative Trade Mandate