Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

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New infographics expose corporate backgrounds of new EU commissioners

Attac Austria and Corporate Europe Observatory are today launching new 'wanted posters' about prospective members of the new European Commission, to expose details of their corporate backgrounds or other aspects of their careers which make them unsuitable to act as commissioner and promote the interests of 500 million European citizens.

The European people have a right to know who are the new commissioners that will make important decisions on their behalf. It cannot be right that an ex-corporate lobbyist is put in charge of regulating the financial services sector. And it cannot be right that an ex-petroleum industry insider becomes responsible for climate action. We want a Commission which acts in the interests of the European people and environment, not European corporations.

Read more about the proposed new commissioners below:

Further infographics will be launched during the coming week.

 

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Congratulazioni

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The corporate lobby tour