Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

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The COP19 Guide to Corporate Lobbying:

New report published by CEO and TNI, a 32-page guide to the web of corporate lobbying and industry capture of COP19, the yearly UN climate negotiations, taking place in Warsaw, 11-22 November 2013. The guide exposes the eleven official corporate partners of the conference, takes a look at some of the other influential Polish lobbies, and examines an extensive list of the lobby groups attending the COP. It also covers the false solutions that are being offered up by these corporate lobbies, such as shale gas, carbon capture and storage (CCS) and carbon markets. 

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)'s yearly talks have become a "must attend" event for huge numbers of business and industry lobbyists, all eager to promote their preferred "solution" to tackling climate change – solutions which protect their business interests, provide them with new opportunities to profit and most importantly of all, allow them to continue polluting the climate and destroying the environment for everyone.

This year marks the 19th session of the UNFCCC's Conference of the Parties (COP19), and the climate talks are taking place in the Polish capital of Warsaw, 11-22 November 2013. COP19 is the first UN climate talks to have corporate sponsorship, with some of the biggest climate crooks as official 'partners', including ArcelorMittal, Alstom and BMW.

This guide to the web of corporate lobbying and industry capture exposes the eleven official corporate partners of the conference, takes a look at some of the other influential Polish lobbies, and examines an extensive list of the lobby groups attending the COP, according to the sector they represent. These sectors include fossil fuels, cross-sectoral big business groups, carbon market and financial players, agribusiness and agrofuels, as well as some of the big polluting industries. Throughout the lobby guide you'll also find boxes on the false solutions that are being offered up by these corporate lobbies, such as shale gas, carbon capture and storage (CCS) and carbon markets.

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This story is part of our blog Corporate COP19. Read all the other stories here.
For the latest, follow in Twitter: #CorporateCOP19 @pascoesabido @ecospaceship

Primary issue: 
The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)'s yearly talks have become a "must attend" event for huge numbers of business and industry lobbyists, all eager to promote their preferred "solution" to tackling climate change – solutions which protect their business interests, provide them with new opportunities to profit and most importantly of all, allow them to continue polluting the climate and destroying the environment for everyone.This year marks the 19th session of the UNFCCC's Conference of the Parties (COP19), and the climate talks are taking place in the Polish capital of Warsaw, 11-22 November 2013. COP19 is the first UN climate talks to have corporate sponsorship, with some of the biggest climate crooks as official 'partners', including ArcelorMittal, Alstom and BMW.This guide to the web of corporate lobbying and industry capture exposes the eleven official corporate partners of the conference, takes a look at some of the other influential Polish lobbies, and examines an extensive list of the lobby groups attending the COP, according to the sector they represent. These sectors include fossil fuels, cross-sectoral big business groups, carbon market and financial players, agribusiness and agrofuels, as well as some of the big polluting industries. Throughout the lobby guide you'll also find boxes on the false solutions that are being offered up by these corporate lobbies, such as shale gas, carbon capture and storage (CCS) and carbon markets.###This story is part of our blog Corporate COP19. Read all the other stories here. For the latest, follow in Twitter: #CorporateCOP19 @pascoesabido @ecospaceship
 

Comments

Submitted by Joan Harrison (not verified) on

The United Nations published a study in 2006, "Livestock's Long Shadow," documenting that animal agriculture produces more greenhouse gas emissions per year than the entire transportation industry. There are numerous subsequent studies--books, articles, videos, chapters in books, etc.-- elaborating on the UN's conclusions and in some cases going beyond the UN's data. The Worldwatch Institute report of 2009, "Livestock and Climate Change," argues that 51% of the world's annual greenhouse gas emissions--largely methane and nitrous oxide--are from animal agriculture. The authors state,

" Although methane warms the atmosphere much more strongly than does CO2, its half-life in the atmosphere is only about 8 years, versus at least 100 years for CO2.As a result, a significant reduction in livestock raised worldwide would reduce GHGs relatively quickly compared with measures involving renewable energy and energy efficiency."

Yet news reports about the UN Climate Summits never seem to mention either methane or the role of animal farming in climate change or the one thing that could begin to turn around the current juggernaut of climate catastrophes ...adopting a vegan diet. Why? Is there anyone out there at such summits who has ever recommended so much as implementing in every city across the world a "meatless Mondays" campaign?

The International Civil Aviation Organization is expected to agree a new climate deal at its current assembly meeting. But its promise of “carbon neutral” flying through voluntary carbon offsetting is delusive, posing new threats to the environment and communities.

It's almost six months since EU Climate Commissioner Miguel Arias Cañete claimed to have negotiated an historic global deal to tackle climate change at COP21in Paris. The 3 May also marked a year and a half of Cañete being in the job. However, he and his his boss, Vice President of the Commission Maros Šefčovič, continue to give privileged access to fossil fuel players trashing the climate, who have enjoyed eight meetings to every one involving renewable energy or energy efficiency interests since the Paris deal was signed. Rather than a change of direction, it's business as usual for the European Commission following the Paris Agreement, which is great news for Big Energy but a disaster for those serious about tackling climate change.

In the middle of May over 4000 people from all over Europe gathered in the Lusatia region in Eastern Germany. The plan? To block a Vattenfall-owned opencast lignite mine.

In light of the ITRE Opinion and forthcoming discussion on the proposed Directive to reform the Emissions Trading System (and “enhance cost-effective emission reductions and low-carbon investments”), CEO offers comments. 

Ultimately, revisions of this sort are nowhere near enough. The new ETS Directive requires some "damage limitation." But it is also a time to reflect on the need to move beyond emissions trading at the heart of EU climate policy. There are many ways to achieve this: http://corporateeurope.org/climate-and-energy/2014/01/life-beyond-emissi...

The Commission proposal for 'mandatory' transparency register is a disappointment. Its measures will do little to help journalists, civil society and citizens scrutinise the corporate lobbies trying to manipulate EU policies in their favour.
Corporate Europe Observatory is looking for an experienced, creative and dynamic outreach and mobilisation organiser to strengthen our visibility as well as public engagement with CEO's work in countries across Europe. The 13-month contract will run from 1 December 2016 to 31 December 2017.
CETA is a sweeping trade deal restricting public policy options in areas as diverse as intellectual property rights, government procurement, food safety, financial regulation, the temporary movement of workers, domestic regulation and public services, to name just a few of the topics explored in this analysis.
The International Civil Aviation Organization is expected to agree a new climate deal at its current assembly meeting. But its promise of “carbon neutral” flying through voluntary carbon offsetting is delusive, posing new threats to the environment and communities.
 
 
 
 
 
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The corporate lobby tour