The corporate lobby tour

The power of lobbies

Sometimes stories in the news can make you wonder who is really pulling the strings. This 10-minute video exposes the role corporate lobby groups have in EU decision-making – who they are, how they get what they want, and how they affect you, and others like you all over Europe, from the food on your plate, to rules for bankers, to the chemicals allowed in everyday products. Watch, learn, and share! For more information you can also consult our Lobby Planet guide to the Brussels bubble. And get involved!

If you'd like to research the world of corporate lobbying, we have put together a list of free online tools that can help.

 

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Comments

Submitted by Arun Dohle (not verified) on

Well done!

Submitted by Roger Doudna (not verified) on

This is the overriding issue of our time. Please do what you can to assure a substantial treaty emerges from Lima and then Paris.

Submitted by Marc Smits (not verified) on

Interesting contents. The narrator made me stop listening. Only professional native speakers make the magic happen.

Submitted by Gareth (not verified) on

Don't usually like conspiratorial diatribes delivered over apple-esque info-graphics, but this one was surprisingly acute. Not sure which voice the previous post would deem "native" to European audience, but there you have it.

Submitted by anna (not verified) on

it isn't the European Council decides on EU legislation, but the Council of Ministers(also named the Council of the European Union)

Submitted by laetitia (not verified) on

Very well done video!
Where is it possible to retrieve the info regarding the circular draft which states that 70% of the lobbyists are paid by corporates to lobby in their favour? I wasn't aware it was such an important number in comparison to the other lobby groups.

Submitted by OpenStandards (not verified) on

The mp4 video is not visible in FireFox 51.0.1 nor the very popular VLC (2.2.4) on Linux. Can you provide a legal unencumbered format like webm? Or put the footage on a hoster, who supports free and open standards, which allow me to enter the party ;-)

Thanks for reading

Submitted by Erik Wesselius on

Dear OpenStandards,

I am not experiencing any problems watching this clip in Firefox 52.0 on an up-to-date Arch Linux system. I can also watch it in the gnome mpv player...

Until reading your comment I was not really aware of the WebM open video format. I see your point about using WebM instead of mp4 and I  have just used vlc to convert the video into WebM format. The only issue remaining is the length of the video. It should be 10:24 but now the player indicates total length 39:51, plays normally until the end of the clip (10:24 and then jumps to 39:51. If you could help me to get the total length indication right that would be wonderful.

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Stop ISDS campaign 2019

This year provides a rare opportunity to end some of the most outrageous rights enjoyed by big business: the investor-state dispute settlement system or ISDS. Under ISDS corporations and the rich have sued governments for billions of euros – for anything from introducing health warnings on cigarettes to banning dirty oil drilling. Campaigners and social movements are uniting in 2019 to put an end to this parallel justice system for big business.

Whenever a government passes a law which could potentially affect profits, the ISDS system enables companies to hit back with lawsuits for damages - often worth billions of euros. Under the ISDS (Investor-State Dispute Settlement) system, corporations have already sued countries for anything from introducing health warnings on cigarettes to placing a moratorium on fracking.

Coal garnered much media attention, thanks to the Polish Government and US President Trump’s support. But it was the gas industry that really stunk up the conference, its influence seeping into all corners of the negotiating halls. Luckily activists and communities were present to call industry out and demand real solutions.

Lobbying around the EU Copyright Directive has been intense: big-budget tech platforms led by Google as well as tech industry trade associations on one side, historically important collecting societies, the creative industries and publishers on the other. The interests and opinions of citizens have become sidelined in the resulting turmoil.

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