Food and agriculture

Agribusiness lobbying in Brussels involves biotech, food, animal feed, agrofuels and pesticide producers targeting decision makers to weaken regulations or to get subsidies. You can find CEO's work on food and agriculture here or visit our specific page on the EU's food safety authority (EFSA).

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Jess Rowlands, a US expert exposed in the "Monsanto Papers" in a possible collusion with Monsanto, intervened in EFSA's glyphosate assessment, providing information which comforted EFSA in its decision to discard the conclusions of a key study showing cancer in mice exposed to glyphosate. Following the revelation, EFSA told the press and civil society that it had double-checked Rowlands' information. But when requested by CEO to prove it had actually performed these double-checks, EFSA had nothing to show.

After many years of criticism and a very long drafting process, EFSA has finally adopted and published its new independence policy. But does it solve the problems it needs to solve? A lot remains unclear. Here is our first analysis.

At CEO, we are exposing how corporate lobby groups impact EU decisions on food and agriculture, and we are campaigning against their damaging influence on EU decisions. We’re asking for your financial support to continue and develop this work: producing in-depth research and campaigning is costly, and the best way to guarantee our independence is with donations from our readers and supporters. Any amount large or small will make a difference to our work!

Glyphosate specialists consulted by CEO argue that EFSA’s data disclosure to CEO could in principle allow limited scrutiny on the agency's glyphosate assessment work, and some insights, but in practice the data is very difficult to handle and cannot be used for publication, making it impossible for scientists to use.