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TTIP: A box of tricks for corporate climate criminals

A new briefing by AITEC and CEO explains why TTIP, and especially regulatory cooperation, could put a stranglehold on our ability to create the energy transition required to tackle climate change.
The new briefing gives examples of how regulatory cooperation in TTIP will enable big polluters to keep polluting and will help corporations tangle up regulations they dislike.
Regulatory cooperation could be the weapon to kill legislation to make investment in coal more expensive or to kill regulations to ramp up the energy efficiency of electrical appliances.
TTIP is thus a threat to climate justice.

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Submitted by Magnus Thulin (not verified) on

Stop TTIP's grip on our climate.

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