Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

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Crucial lessons to be learned

This month the European Commission for the first time ever blocked an ex-Commissioner from taking up a job in the private sector. The former Internal Market Commission Charles McCreevy had to resign from his directorship at London-based banking start-up NBNK after Catherine Day, the Secretary General of the Commission informed him that the Commission was unable to approve the post. She told McCreevy that “should he wish to pursue this activity, a negative decision will be submitted to the Commission for adoption” on October 4. This was after the Ad Hoc Ethic’s Committee set up to advise the Commission on ex-Commissioners potential conflicts of interests issued a negative opinion on August 24. Corporate Europe Observatory has identified some key lessons to be learned from the events leading up to McCreevy's resignation - read the article here:

 

In the last years, controversies around the financialisation of nature and the concept of natural capital have fuelled divisions within civil society.

Over 450 public interest groups from across Europe and Canada today published an open letter urging legislators to vote against the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA). They joined forces to defend people and planet against the threats posed by the EU-Canada agreement.

8 November 2016 saw the annual lobby fest between the Commission and BusinessEurope. Lasting for over seven hours, attracting four commissioners and the secretary-general, as well as 26 major corporate interests (who between them spend over €31,789,000 a year on EU lobbying), this is exclusive, privileged access at its most extreme.

New analysis of lobby meetings shows that EU Climate Commissioner Miguel Arias Cañete and his colleague Maroš Šefčovič, Vice President for the Energy Union, have overwhelmingly met corporate lobbyists, rather than public interest groups.

The corporate lobby tour