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Arms industry lobbying: a guide to the Brussels frontline

As the current Polish presidency (July – December 2011) sets priorities on defence policy and homeland security, CEO together with Vredesactie and Action Paix has compiled a short guide to the vast lobbying network put in place by the arms industry in Brussels.

Its influence on EU policy-making is embedded in a growing defence and security apparatus based on the vision of 'a strong industry underpinning a strong EU defence policy'. For the European arms industry, lobbying in Brussels has become increasingly important with the advancing militarization of the European Union. Directives concerning arms procurement and arms trade, research in homeland security, or cooperative armaments projects make EU policies worth billions of Euros to the arms industry.

Use this leaflet to find out more about arms industry lobbying as you walk through the EU Quarter.

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