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New report exposes how the industries most responsible for climate change, especially fossil fuel TNCs, are obstructing real progress to address the climate crisis

Less than 18 months into the job, Climate Action and Energy Commissioner Miguel Arias Cañete is immersed in several scandals.

The first corporate sponsors of this winter's 'historic' UN climate talks (COP21) have been unofficially unveiled: luxury brand Luis Vuitton (LVMH) and Suez Environment, a key member of the French pro-fracking lobby. According to an article by ATTAC's Maxime Combes, others were initially announced in the press (BMW, Vattenfall and New Holland Agriculture) but later denied by the COP21 organisers.

Here are some examples of the blurry line between private business and public office that have characterised the Spanish nominee for the Climate Action and Energy Commissioner Arias Cañete’s career.

New research by Global Justice Now and Corporate Europe Observatory shows that 91 per cent of meetings held by UK trade ministers (from October 2016 to June 2017) and 70 per cent of meetings held by UK Brexit ministers have been with business, too often big business interests. This corporate bias in ministerial access is part of an ongoing trend that we have previously highlighted for both Brexit and trade ministers.

As we head towards 2018, it's important to take stock of some of this year’s highlights in our fight against the corporate capture of democracy.

Corporate Europe Observatory has started a new workstream to publish investigations which expose corporate lobby influence over the decision-making of the Council of the EU (member states) and how this impacts on resulting laws and policies. This is one of murkiest and least-known aspects of EU decision-making.

It took president Juncker over a year to propose new ethics rules for Commissioners after ex-President Barroso had shocked Europe with his new job at Goldman Sachs. A year of inaction later, the Commission is now in a hurry to implement a lackluster reform.