climate change

The EU Emissions Trading System has failed to reduce emissions, but that hasn’t stopped the Commission from pushing other countries into using carbon markets.

Hundreds of activists followed the public call for a peaceful action against the corporate greenwashing event “Solutions COP21”in Le Grande Palais. Marking the opening of the exposition on the fourth of December, the action denounced the false solutions peddled by industry in Paris during the COP21 climate talks with a creative act of civil disobedience. Watch the action video here and our Pascoe Sabido getting carried away (literally) here.

Companies that profit from polluting and have a vested interest in the continued exploitation of fossil fuels have no place influencing talks designed to move us away from dirty energy.

There is a diplomatic silence over carbon trading at COP21, but a Paris climate agreement could offer a lifeline to carbon “offsetting” schemes, while new rules could help build a global carbon market.

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Major news on the glyphosate front: the first ever independent analysis of the complete confidential data set sent by industry to the EU for the re-licensing of glyphosate, enabled by an exceptional disclosure, shows possible serious omissions in EFSA and ECHA's safety assessment. It is high time the complete data set is published in full to enable full scrutiny by the scientific community.

Reports of TTIP's death have been greatly exaggerated; its agenda fits all too well with Trump’s corporate buddies and with the EU’s corporate trade agenda - his plea to change US trade policy and populist outbursts notwithstanding. It is likely to return in one form or another.

Remember the story of how the EU was going to take action against hormone disruptors, or EDCs? This week will see another make-or-break moment for the regulation of these harmful chemicals, fought heavily by the chemical industry, when a group of Member State experts will meet.

A new investigation by Corporate Europe Observatory and Seas at Risk reveals that fishing industry lobbyists have used press passes to access the EU Council building during crucial ministerial negotiations on fishing quotas.