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A Corporate Europe Observatory complaint to the lobby register secretariat is challenging the Commission to properly implement its own lobby transparency rules. 

Black-listed from the coal summit, inside the business day and at loggerheads with the US Chamber of Commerce. The first few days of the second week of the international climate talks in Warsaw have been a busy time for a fly on the wall reporter of the corporate capture of COP19.
Welcome to our mini-series of exposés, looking behind the greenwash to reveal the dirty underbelly of the climate criminals asked to sponsor this winter's UN climate talks in Poland, COP19. First up: the world's largest steel and mining company, with emissions greater than the whole of the Czech Republic, ArcelorMittal.
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Dirty business in Warsaw

As the warm-up climate talks in Warsaw end, the message from the Polish government is clear: big companies get privileged access to negotiators, but NGOs are excluded.

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Czech journalist and Corporate Europe Observatory board member Jakub Patočka explains what the rise of oligarchs and the demise of democracy in Central and Eastern Europe have to do with EU funding.

A seemingly innocent concept, the “innovation priniciple” has been invented by some of the dirtiest industries in Europe. They have carefully and strategically inserted it into the EU system, where it could have a significant impact on the shaping of new EU legislation or policies, and those under revision.

Climate change and biodiversity losses loom large on the list of global environmental concerns. Both UN processes for adressing these issues – the UNFCCC for climate change and the UN CBD for biodiversity – are closely followed by corporate lobbyists. Now the UN Biodiversity Convention finally features conflict of interest rules – a step still not matched by the UNFCCC.

The slogan of this year's climate talks is “black to green” -  appropriate, given the dirty energy companies that are bankrolling the conference. While the sponsors hide behind green branding, their core business models depend on coal, oil and gas, and are therefore absolutely incompatible with the Paris Agreement, let alone a planet still habitable in the future.