COP21

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It's almost six months since EU Climate Commissioner Miguel Arias Cañete claimed to have negotiated an historic global deal to tackle climate change at COP21in Paris. The 3 May also marked a year and a half of Cañete being in the job. However, he and his his boss, Vice President of the Commission Maros Šefčovič, continue to give privileged access to fossil fuel players trashing the climate, who have enjoyed eight meetings to every one involving renewable energy or energy efficiency interests since the Paris deal was signed. Rather than a change of direction, it's business as usual for the European Commission following the Paris Agreement, which is great news for Big Energy but a disaster for those serious about tackling climate change.

The EU Emissions Trading System has failed to reduce emissions, but that hasn’t stopped the Commission from pushing other countries into using carbon markets.

Companies that profit from polluting and have a vested interest in the continued exploitation of fossil fuels have no place influencing talks designed to move us away from dirty energy.

There is a diplomatic silence over carbon trading at COP21, but a Paris climate agreement could offer a lifeline to carbon “offsetting” schemes, while new rules could help build a global carbon market.

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Members of the copyright industry and their political allies are fighting proposed copyright exceptions. For the 285 million blind and visually impaired people globally, such exceptions would provide better access to a wider range of print publications.

The EU is finally looking to ratify the Marrakesh Treaty to make a greater range of print publications available in accessible formats for visually impaired people. But as ratification draws closer, the extent and potential harm of publishing industry and member state lobbying is already excessive, our new research shows.

The European Commission is set to entrench the dangerous investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) system, which foreign investors can use to subvert democratic decision-making. CEO opposes this attempt to establish a global super court for corporations.

Ahead of the European Central Bank’s regular monetary policy meeting, 70 European civil society organisations call on the bank to stop aggravating climate change through its opaque ‘quantitative easing’ investments in polluting industries.