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With the 23rd edition of the UN climate talks, COP23, now put to bed, CEO takes a look at what was achieved and what's left to play for.

Next month's UN climate talks in Warsaw, aka COP19, will be remembered as 'the Corporate COP'. While the international climate negotiations have become progressively more oriented towards the needs of big business – and less around the needs of the climate – this year it has reached new heights, in particular the 'pre-COP' organised by Poland's Minister for Environment Marcin Korolec: dirty industry were invited to precook the negotiations before it has even begun. What's more worrying is that Korolec and the UN want to make such blatant corporate capture a permanent fixture at all talks.
Large corporations and their lobby groups are trying to prevent governments from endorsing effective climate action and instead promoting false solutions like dirty coal and carbon markets. We need your donations, however big or small, to help us sound the alarm in the run-up to and during Warsaw conference through our investigative work.

The push for reform continues from within the European Parliament, from the Ombudsman’s office and from civil society. This year, two Ombudsman inquiries, a Parliament discussion on the use of transitional allowances to prevent conflicts of interest, and finally, Parliament’s reaction to the Commission proposal for reforming Commissioners’ ethics rules all need to be wrapped up.

Here’s a roundup of the various factors that might push a reform of the revolving-door rules in 2018.

The decision of the European Ombudsman to ask the European Central Bank President to end his membership of an opaque and exclusive club dominated by financial corporations is a step towards ending a culture of secretive collusion between regulators and big banks.

CETA has now been provisionally applied. Our new mobile and desktop game Dodgy Deals lets players face some of the dangerous features of trade deals like CETA and shows what is at stake.

91 per cent of meetings held by UK trade ministers (10/2016 - 06/2017) and 70 per cent of meetings held by UK Brexit ministers have been with business, too often big business, interests. This corporate bias in ministerial access is part of an ongoing trend.