investor-state dispute settlement

Trade unions and environmental organisations are calling on the European Parliament's environmental committee to reject the controversial EU-Canada trade deal CETA, which could undermine EU environmental and public health standards.

Ahead of the 12th round of TTIP negotiations, 280 civil society groups from across Europe have called on the EU and the US to eliminate excessive investor rights from the TTIP, CETA and all other trade deals.

Canadian company TransCanada wants to sue the US for over US$15 billion in compensation - because President Obama rejected the contested Keystone XL oil pipeline. Another warning sign for extreme corporate rights in EU trade deals such as TTIP and CETA.

On the eve of the Canada–EU summit more than hundred organizations on both sides of the Atlantic have issued a statement which strongly opposes the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) because it will enrich multinational corporations at the expense of citizens’ rights. CEO is one of the signatories.

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Major news on the glyphosate front: the first ever independent analysis of the complete confidential data set sent by industry to the EU for the re-licensing of glyphosate, enabled by an exceptional disclosure, shows possible serious omissions in EFSA and ECHA's safety assessment. It is high time the complete data set is published in full to enable full scrutiny by the scientific community.

Reports of TTIP's death have been greatly exaggerated; its agenda fits all too well with Trump’s corporate buddies and with the EU’s corporate trade agenda - his plea to change US trade policy and populist outbursts notwithstanding. It is likely to return in one form or another.

Remember the story of how the EU was going to take action against hormone disruptors, or EDCs? This week will see another make-or-break moment for the regulation of these harmful chemicals, fought heavily by the chemical industry, when a group of Member State experts will meet.

A new investigation by Corporate Europe Observatory and Seas at Risk reveals that fishing industry lobbyists have used press passes to access the EU Council building during crucial ministerial negotiations on fishing quotas.