investor-state dispute settlement

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Trade unions and environmental organisations are calling on the European Parliament's environmental committee to reject the controversial EU-Canada trade deal CETA, which could undermine EU environmental and public health standards.

Ahead of the 12th round of TTIP negotiations, 280 civil society groups from across Europe have called on the EU and the US to eliminate excessive investor rights from the TTIP, CETA and all other trade deals.

Canadian company TransCanada wants to sue the US for over US$15 billion in compensation - because President Obama rejected the contested Keystone XL oil pipeline. Another warning sign for extreme corporate rights in EU trade deals such as TTIP and CETA.

On the eve of the Canada–EU summit more than hundred organizations on both sides of the Atlantic have issued a statement which strongly opposes the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) because it will enrich multinational corporations at the expense of citizens’ rights. CEO is one of the signatories.

The push for reform continues from within the European Parliament, from the Ombudsman’s office and from civil society. This year, two Ombudsman inquiries, a Parliament discussion on the use of transitional allowances to prevent conflicts of interest, and finally, Parliament’s reaction to the Commission proposal for reforming Commissioners’ ethics rules all need to be wrapped up.

Here’s a roundup of the various factors that might push a reform of the revolving-door rules in 2018.

The decision of the European Ombudsman to ask the European Central Bank President to end his membership of an opaque and exclusive club dominated by financial corporations is a step towards ending a culture of secretive collusion between regulators and big banks.

CETA has now been provisionally applied. Our new mobile and desktop game Dodgy Deals lets players face some of the dangerous features of trade deals like CETA and shows what is at stake.

91 per cent of meetings held by UK trade ministers (10/2016 - 06/2017) and 70 per cent of meetings held by UK Brexit ministers have been with business, too often big business, interests. This corporate bias in ministerial access is part of an ongoing trend.