regulatory cooperation

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The European Commission is negotiating trade deals and it is currently finalising a deal with Japan, the Japan-European Union Free Trade Agreement or JEFTA.
Regulatory cooperation in JEFTA has the potential to be detrimental to our democracy, giving big business more rights to be involved in lawmaking at an early
stage.

Trade unions and environmental organisations are calling on the European Parliament's environmental committee to reject the controversial EU-Canada trade deal CETA, which could undermine EU environmental and public health standards.

The recent leak of many parts of TTIP, allowing us for the first time to read the negotiating position of the US, confirms our most serious concerns.

Two separate developments on European regulatory issues – regulatory cooperation under TTIP and the "Better Regulation Agenda" – are set to introduce a new style of rulemaking in the EU, one that would introduce severe obstacles to anything that would against the interests of multinational corporations in the EU and the US. 

New research by Global Justice Now and Corporate Europe Observatory shows that 91 per cent of meetings held by UK trade ministers (from October 2016 to June 2017) and 70 per cent of meetings held by UK Brexit ministers have been with business, too often big business interests. This corporate bias in ministerial access is part of an ongoing trend that we have previously highlighted for both Brexit and trade ministers.

As we head towards 2018, it's important to take stock of some of this year’s highlights in our fight against the corporate capture of democracy.

Corporate Europe Observatory has started a new workstream to publish investigations which expose corporate lobby influence over the decision-making of the Council of the EU (member states) and how this impacts on resulting laws and policies. This is one of murkiest and least-known aspects of EU decision-making.

It took president Juncker over a year to propose new ethics rules for Commissioners after ex-President Barroso had shocked Europe with his new job at Goldman Sachs. A year of inaction later, the Commission is now in a hurry to implement a lackluster reform.