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Welcome to JEFTA!

EU-Japan trade deal: Trading away our rights!

The European Commission is currently finalising a deal with Japan, the Japan-European Union Free Trade Agreement or JEFTA.
Regulatory cooperation in JEFTA has the potential to be detrimental to our democracy, giving big business more rights to be involved in lawmaking at an early
stage.

Regulatory cooperation in trade agreements is "a gift which keeps on giving" for big business.

JEFTA is no exception to this rule.

As Keidanren, the Japanese big business federation put it in 2015, 'Japanese companies which are active in the EU market need to... be actively engaged in the development of regulations from the initial stage'. Regulatory cooperation is the opportunity for big business to do this.

Our leaflet explains you how.

Attached files: 

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