Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

The corporate lobby tour

The power of lobbies

Sometimes stories in the news can make you wonder who is really pulling the strings. This 10-minute video exposes the role corporate lobby groups have in EU decision-making – who they are, how they get what they want, and how they affect you, and others like you all over Europe, from the food on your plate, to rules for bankers, to the chemicals allowed in everyday products. Watch, learn, and share! For more information you can also consult our Lobby Planet guide to the Brussels bubble. And get involved!

 

Comments

Submitted by Arun Dohle (not verified) on

Well done!

Submitted by Roger Doudna (not verified) on

This is the overriding issue of our time. Please do what you can to assure a substantial treaty emerges from Lima and then Paris.

Submitted by Marc Smits (not verified) on

Interesting contents. The narrator made me stop listening. Only professional native speakers make the magic happen.

Submitted by Gareth (not verified) on

Don't usually like conspiratorial diatribes delivered over apple-esque info-graphics, but this one was surprisingly acute. Not sure which voice the previous post would deem "native" to European audience, but there you have it.

Submitted by anna (not verified) on

it isn't the European Council decides on EU legislation, but the Council of Ministers(also named the Council of the European Union)

Submitted by laetitia (not verified) on

Very well done video!
Where is it possible to retrieve the info regarding the circular draft which states that 70% of the lobbyists are paid by corporates to lobby in their favour? I wasn't aware it was such an important number in comparison to the other lobby groups.

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8 November 2016 saw the annual lobby fest between the Commission and BusinessEurope. Lasting for over seven hours, attracting four commissioners and the secretary-general, as well as 26 major corporate interests (who between them spend over €31,789,000 a year on EU lobbying), this is exclusive, privileged access at its most extreme.

After winning the Democracy for Sale Award as the worst corporate lobby actor on TTIP, the pesticide industry’s EU lobby group European Crop Protection Association (ECPA) announced they would transfer money to co-organiser Corporate Europe Observatory (CEO). CEO has so far not been able to register this transaction, but will of course return the money to ECPA if it ever arrives, as we never accept corporate funding.

As world leaders prepare for COP22 in Marrakesh, Morocco, this November, the oil and gas industry retains a firm grip on the UN climate talks and climate policy in general. It’s time to break free and reclaim power over climate policy.
There are many potential winners of the awards for the worst lobbyist on TTIP, probably the most corporate dominated trade negotiations in history.

In the last years, controversies around the financialisation of nature and the concept of natural capital have fuelled divisions within civil society.

Over 450 public interest groups from across Europe and Canada today published an open letter urging legislators to vote against the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA). They joined forces to defend people and planet against the threats posed by the EU-Canada agreement.

8 November 2016 saw the annual lobby fest between the Commission and BusinessEurope. Lasting for over seven hours, attracting four commissioners and the secretary-general, as well as 26 major corporate interests (who between them spend over €31,789,000 a year on EU lobbying), this is exclusive, privileged access at its most extreme.

New analysis of lobby meetings shows that EU Climate Commissioner Miguel Arias Cañete and his colleague Maroš Šefčovič, Vice President for the Energy Union, have overwhelmingly met corporate lobbyists, rather than public interest groups.

The corporate lobby tour