Corporate Europe Observatory

Exposing the power of corporate lobbying in the EU

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BP - Extracting Influence in the EU

BP - Extracting Influence at the Heart of the EUOil industry lobbying at the heart of the EU has played a key role in influencing Europe's energy policy, according to a new report from Corporate Europe Observatory and PLATFORM. The report, BP - Extracting Influence at the Heart of the EU, reveals the oil giant's close relationship with decision makers and highlights how the company has convinced Commissioners and others that BP's interests are in the EU's interest - allowing it to promote profit-driven approaches to climate change through emissions trading as well as encouraging risky dependence on Russian gas. BP's close relationship with the EU has led to a "shared agenda" and belief that what is in BP's interest, is also in the interest of the EU.
BP - Extracting influence at the heart of the EU
An Introduction


BP is one of the world’s leading international oil and gas companies (IOCs) and Europe’s second largest corporation. This report examines BP’s interface with Brussels, analysing what the company might achieve through European Union (EU) support and how the company stands to benefit from EU policies. It looks at the resources the company devotes to lobbying in Brussels and the methods it uses.  Two case studies explore in more detail the role BP has played in shaping the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (Putting the Fox in Charge of the Henhouse) and how BP has benefited from the political weight of the EU in its dealings in Russia (BP and Russian Bear). It concludes that BP commands undue influence at the European level and that European energy security and environmental protection have been compromised through a false perception among decision-makers that what is good for BP is also good for the EU.

 

 
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Carbon Welfare

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CEO welcomes the very strongly worded final ruling by European Ombudsman Emily O'Reilly in her inquiry into the Commission's implementation of UN rules for contacts with tobacco industry lobbyists.

Story

Carbon Welfare

The reform of the EU Emissions Trading System could hand more than €230 billion in subsidies to energy intensive industries, a new report from Corporate Europe Observatory shows.

In the last years, controversies around the financialisation of nature and the concept of natural capital have fuelled divisions within civil society.

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The corporate lobby tour