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TTIP: covert attacks on democracy and regulation

A beginners guide to "regulatory cooperation" - now in French, Italian, Portuguese, Greek, Finnish and Spanish.

The EU Commissions' proposals on "regulatory cooperation" poses a threat to regulation that protect our health, the environment and our welfare - and they are a threat to democracy. Read the beginners guide from Corporate Europe Observatory, LobbyControl and Friends of the Earth Europe - now out in English, French, Italian, Portuguese, Greek, Finnish, and Spanish.

The guide explains how TTIP could transform the shape and function of our existing political institutions, particularly their role in ensuring accountability towards citizens for the decisions taken. Of particular concern is the proposal in TTIP for “regulatory cooperation”.

Regulatory cooperation could result in a weakening of democracy and standards to protect us. Controls protecting against everything from toxic chemicals, unhealthy food, downward pressure on wages, to wild speculation by banks – to name just a few – could be under threat from this treaty.

But what is "regulatory cooperation"? What proposals are the negotiators considering? And why is there reason for concern?
Read the beginners guide from Corporate Europe Observatory, LobbyControl and Friends of the Earth Europe.

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