International trade

The EU's trade policy aims to increase the 'competitiveness' of European companies – by guaranteeing them access to raw materials through often secretive free trade deals and by making sure that regulations do not stand in their way. CEO is challenging this craze for so-called competitiveness, which we believe in reality advances the interests of corporate Europe at the expense of social and environmental justice.

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On the occasion of the International Day of Farmers' Struggle, we have jointly with allies prepared five short visions for a sustainable, healthy and fair food and trade policy to restart this important debate.

162 civil society organisations from across Europe have called for European trade policy to be made more democratic. Only a democratic and transparent process from its inception has the potential to ensure that trade and investment agreements will benefit all.

91 per cent of meetings held by UK trade ministers (10/2016 - 06/2017) and 70 per cent of meetings held by UK Brexit ministers have been with business, too often big business, interests. This corporate bias in ministerial access is part of an ongoing trend.

The European Commission is negotiating trade deals and it is currently finalising a deal with Japan, the Japan-European Union Free Trade Agreement or JEFTA.
Regulatory cooperation in JEFTA has the potential to be detrimental to our democracy, giving big business more rights to be involved in lawmaking at an early
stage.

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