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'Better Regulation': corporate-friendly deregulation in disguise

A wave of deregulation is sweeping through the European Commission and member states. If you care about the environment, workers’ rights, or public health, this so-called ‘Better Regulation’ agenda is highly concerning, as it is used to weaken and abolish current rules, while hampering the introduction of new ones. At the same time, big business interests take centre-stage in the considerations of policy-makers, and those with the most lobby power get the biggest say. The aim to ‘cut red tape’ via deregulation featured, for example, in David Cameron's pre-Brexit negotiations with the EU, and neoliberal free-trade deals like TTIP and CETA are set to undermine the protection of the public interest even more. You can also download this FAQ as a pdf.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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